6 weird venues played by famous music acts

Fatboy Slim

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Following the news that superstar DJ Fatboy Slim performed at the Houses Of Parliament in London last night, it’s tempting to wonder whether there’s ever been a more bizarre pairing of venue and star.

Well, WOW247 has been looking into the subject – and we can assure you there’s been even more bizarre gigs in the past. Here are six of the most unusual venues ever played by well-known bands and musicians.

Fatboy Slim
[A bad artist's impression of Fatboy Slim DJing at Westminster]

Sigur Ros played a deserted fish factory

The Icelandic post-rock darlings raised eyebrows back in 2006 when they chose an abandoned fish factory in Djupavik as the venue for a free concert in their home country. Filmed as part of their acclaimed movie Heima, the result proved phenomenally haunting – as well as fittingly unconventional.

Pink Floyd played Pompeii

At a time when prog-rock legends Pink Floyd were just starting to make real waves – but a full two years before Dark Side Of The Moon would see them become globally famous – the band decided that they’d had enough of playing to traditional clubs and concert halls in 1972, and reckoned a gig in a ruined, ancient city would be a better bet.

With the gigantic, historically-renowned amphitheatre as their sparse backdrop, they showcased tracks from the underrated Meddle, as well as a few ’60s favourites. They must have seemed crazy at the time, but Live At Pompeii is now regarded as a classic live album.

Presidents Of The USA played Mount Rushmore

Probably best known for their mid-90s hit Peaches and their big-selling self-titled album, alt-rock trio The Presidents quite literally stayed true to their name by performing at America’s iconic landmark – with Washington and co looking on somewhat stoney-faced.

Recorded for an MTV special at the height of their fame in 1996, it remains somewhat bizarre to see the band and crowd grunging away in front of their famous forefathers.

David Hasselhoff played the Berlin Wall

There’s probably a joke to be made about Germany having suffered enough already here. But let’s be honest: that country loves the Hoff, so what better way to mark the downfall of the Berlin Wall and the re-unification of the nation than with a stirring performance from the man himself?

Marking the historic, emotional occasion with a rendition of Looking For Freedom, never has so much cheesiness been so surprisingly poignant.

Rage Against The Machine played Wall Street

If they hadn’t already made it abundantly clear that they were pretty hacked-off with the system through tracks such as Killing In The Name and Take The Power Back, angsty rap-metallers Rage attempted to drive home their anger at the capitalist status quo by performing on Wall Street back in 2000.

Shooting the video for Sleep Now In The Fire on the steps of the Federal Building, things soon descended into chaos as police ordered the band to stop playing, and hundreds of fans responded by attempting to storm the stock exchange. And you thought Justin Bieber’s late-show at the O2 spelled anarchy.

British Sea Power played … everywhere

Lovable rock eccentrics British Sea Power have become absolutely dedicated to discovering and playing the weirdest gig locations imaginable, with the most audacious shows taking in such venues as an underground cavern in Cornwall, the most remote pub in the country at the top of the North York Moors, and – quite literally – a ferry across the Mersey.

Perhaps the indie geniuses’ most high-profile gig was at the Natural History Museum in 2008, where they braved giant dinosaurs and other extraordinary exhibits to delight a crowd of 600 fans.

What do you think of these astonishing shows? And are there any others you feel should have been included? Share your thoughts in the comments below, on Twitter with #wow247 or over at Facebook

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Mark is the content manager for WOW247 in Leeds. When he isn't waxing lyrical about Ben Wheatley and Caravan Palace, he's landing news, assembling guides and penning features.