EIFF review: The Nut Job

Animated caper The Nut Job got its UK premiere at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. Review by Alex Watson Since the ground-breaking popularity of Toy Story back in 1995, the production of animated family films has steadily increased, as many studios attempt to compete with Pixar’s astounding achievements. We all remember the stupendous successes and flailing …

EIFF review: We’ll Never Have Paris

Simon Helberg and Jocelyn Towne’s comedy We’ll Never Have Paris is the Closing Night Gala movie at Edinburgh International Film Festival. Review by Alex Watson You will probably recognise Simon Helberg from the comedy series The Big Bang Theory, but with We’ll Never Have Paris (as writer, co-director and star) he throws off his science …

EIFF review: The Guvnors

Bringing Harley Alexander-Sule of Rizzle Kicks to the screen in his first ever leading-role, The Guvnors is a stylish and gritty thriller that visualizes two generations of London’s gangs. Review by Rachael Bell The film’s premise is simple and the story is set-up with an opening scene that shows the inevitable stand-off between veteran-gangster Mitch and street scum …

EIFF review: Greyhawk

Review by Alex Watson On the surface, Guy Pitt’s first feature length offering may appear to be a great deal of fuss over a missing dog. However, the shrewd comments that Pitt makes about relationships and society through this simple story are well thought out and likely to strike a chord with the majority of viewers. …

EIFF review: Castles in the Sky

Eddie Izzard plays Scottish engineer and developer of radar, Robert Watson-Watt, in the Second World War drama Castles in the Sky, which got its world premiere at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. Review by Alex Watson With his latest offering Glaswegian director Gillies MacKinnon ticks many enviable and unexpected boxes. Castles in the Sky is a tense …

EIFF review: Hide and Seek

The world premiere of Joanna Coates’ escapist feature Hide and Seek makes a compassionate appeal for the simple life at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. Review by Rachael Bell Hide and Seek has a childlike quality to it, with the addition of amplified sexual content. The characters are able to explore each other and themselves and as they become more comfortable …

EIFF review: Hellion

The UK premiere of Hellion at the Edinburgh International Film Festival stirs audiences as up-and-coming film-maker Kat Chandler masterfully directs a cast of mainly newcomer children and tells the story of responsibility and loss in rural Texas. Review by Rachael Bell Hellion brings Aaron Paul to the screen to try on a new role, proving that his success on …

EIFF review: The Japanese Dog

Minimalistic family drama from Romania, The Japanese Dog gets its UK premiere at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. Review by Alex Watson Despite a formulaic plot, The Japanese Dog is a heartwarming story of love and loss, complemented by truly breathtaking camerawork. Set in modern day Romania, the film focusses on the life of recently widowed …

EIFF review: We Are Monster

New British drama We Are Monster got its world premiere at Edinburgh International Film Festival to tell the brutal true story of violent racist Robert Stewart. Review by Rachael Bell Writer Leeshon Alexander, also the star of the film, looks at the hatred and ferocity at the forefront of Zahid Mubarek’s unprovoked murder. Alexander’s dual performance, split between …

EIFF review: The Infinite Man

A man’s attempts to construct the ultimate romantic weekend backfire in Hugh Sullivan’s The Infinite Man, which gets its UK premiere at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. Review by Alex Watson The Infinite Man is the mind bending story of one determined boyfriend’s well-meaning efforts to capture and preserve the perfect anniversary. When Dean’s (Josh …

Interview: Brian Cox and James Robinson on Braveheart

Despite its sometimes dubious adherence to historical fact, Mel Gibson’s Braveheart was a defining moment in the way Scotland thought about its past, making the tale of William Wallace suddenly relevant to a cinema-going audience. Brian Cox and James Robinson, who both appeared in the 1995 film, were at the Edinburgh International Film Festival for a red carpet …

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