Dance review: Correction
Dance review: Correction

Edinburgh Festival Fringe dance review: Correction, reviewed by The Scotsman’s Kelly Apter. ★★★★ If this is a statement about humanity, then we don’t emerge terribly well from it. Seven performers stand in a line facing the audience, wearing an assortment of boots which are glued to the ground. At first, they explore their predicament – …

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Edinburgh Festival

Edinburgh Festival Fringe dance review: Correction, reviewed by The Scotsman’s Kelly Apter.

★★★★

If this is a statement about humanity, then we don’t emerge terribly well from it. Seven performers stand in a line facing the audience, wearing an assortment of boots which are glued to the ground. At first, they explore their predicament – they can move from side to side, and forwards and backwards, but they can’t leave the spot.

Part of this exploration involves poking each other in the shoulder to see what their neighbour can do. But although they display an interest in one another, there is little in the way of care. Dancers fall on their backs and repeatedly attempt to get back up – yet the others simply look on, dispassionately, refusing to lend a hand. One man takes out a banana to eat, offers it to his six companions before taking a single bite, and is handed back an empty skin.

So, while the milk of human kindness doesn’t exactly flow through the feet of Czech company VerTeDance, fascinating and witty movement most certainly does. A surprising amount of diversity is to be found in the choreography, despite the dancers’ inability to use their feet or lift each other. Slow forward leans, ordinarily impossible, now defy the pull of gravity. Moments of unison, although rare, are striking when they come.

Sitting behind the trapped dancers, observing their plight, is the Clarinet Factory – a group of four musicians who add both soundtrack and atmosphere with clarinets of varying styles.

Through Correction, VerTeDance hopes to show that complete freedom comes at a price – namely that we have to decide what to do with it, and potentially lose something else as a result. Here, when denied the ability to make all their own choices, the dancers ultimately rejoice in the decisions they do have power over – leading to a thought-provoking burst of joyfulness.

Zoo Southside (Venue 82) until 19 August / listings

Published in The Scotsman on 17 August 2015

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