Children’s show review: Funny Bones Trash
Children’s show review: Funny Bones Trash

Edinburgh Festival Fringe children’s show review: Funny Bones Trash, reviewed by The Scotsman’s Sally Stott ★★★★ Some people try to put on kid’s shows; others are the kind of naturally funny, imaginative and entertaining performers that old and young alike effortlessly fall in love with. Double act K-Bow (Keiichiro Miyaji) and Chris (Peters) fit into …

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Edinburgh Festival Fringe children’s show review: Funny Bones Trash, reviewed by The Scotsman’s Sally Stott

★★★★

Some people try to put on kid’s shows; others are the kind of naturally funny, imaginative and entertaining performers that old and young alike effortlessly fall in love with.

Double act K-Bow (Keiichiro Miyaji) and Chris (Peters) fit into the latter group. Having met in Edinburgh as travelling street performers 15 years ago – one from Manchester and the other from Tokyo – they formed a thrillingly original partnership, despite the fact neither of them could speak the other’s language.

Using everyday objects, magic and clowning to create amusing little stunts that playfully parody films and popular music, their rubber-faced onstage personas are delightfully off-the-wall, with the amiable but long-suffering camaraderie of great clown duos such as Laurel and Hardy. “Life is a cabaret,” sings Liza Minnelli in the first of an upbeat line-up of jukebox routines, which the two men, strangely skeletal and yet highly expressive, rattle through in a way that will have you bopping along in agreement.

In a particularly ingenious sequence, a man is picked out from the front row and given a tube of paper that becomes, in turn, a lightsaber for an on-stage fight, a flute to play a jig on, some dreadlocks to wear, a Hawaiian skirt to dance in and some pompoms to wave while cheerleading to the sound of Toni Basil’s Mickey. Despite this being a kid’s show, K-Bow and Chris have the kind of rock ’n’ roll attitude that is highly appealing as an adult too, and it’s fascinating to hear how different ages get different jokes.

One of the highlights is when they morph into masked little cartoonlike versions of themselves, able to increase and decrease their height with rapid, and frequently alarming, speed.

Communicating entirely through quirky little sounds, they convey comedy, sadness and a lot of fun without saying a single word because, sometimes, you don’t have to.

Gilded Balloon (Venue 14), until 30 August, 11am.

Published in The Scotsman on 24 August 2015

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